Timeline

3 thoughts on “Timeline

  1. I have 2 names to add as suggestions on Women’s History in Missouri and the Hall of Fame for Famous Missourians:

    Marie Turner Harvey was a well known educator in the early part of the 20th Century. Her work is known to have inspired John Dewey, founder of our American Educational System. A book (New Schools from Old) was written about Mrs. Harvey by Evelyn Dewey (John Dewey’s daughter) in 1919. This work is still in print. Mrs. Harvey’s work was principally at the Porter School in Adair County. People traveled from across the country and around the world to learn about her teaching practices.

    Doris Akers was a well known gospel singer and composer. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doris_Akers Ms. Akers was born in Brookfield and grew up in Kirksville.

    I am dismayed that so few of those honored in the Hall of Famous Missourians are women (only 7). Would you please work to correct this omission? All those little girls through older women (and young boys through older women) need to see the noteworthy women in our history who have accomplished so much. Thanks…

  2. There is a small edit that needs to happen in the above entry which I wrote earlier today. For the last paragraph, it should read …”(and young boys through older men)”…

    To exclude examples of famous women tells children through adults that there is nothing that women can do that is of importance (in the State of Missouri). That says indirectly, that what women do does not matter. This is especially damaging to children (and most specifically to young girls) whose minds are being shaped by what they see and experience as sanctioned in the adult world. Everyone, regardless of the age, needs to see that famous women are important, essential, and recognized.

    We just have some catching up to do.

    1. Well put. You outline many of the reasons why this blog was started. When kids learn about history in school, they learn that women were pretty much non-existent. I don’t have the money to change textbooks, but I can offer a place for teachers and students to learn about females in history.

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