Adeline Couzins · Bellefontaine Cemetery · Civil War · Nurse · St. Louis · St. Louis Ladies Union Aid Society · Veteran

Adeline Couzins

Adeline Couzins was wounded at Vicksburg. How is that possible you ask, her being a woman? Because during the Civil War, she followed the action to help where help was needed. She was one of the founders of the St. Louis Ladies Union Aid Society, a group of women who came together to help soldiers. What that meant for Adeline was greeting… Continue reading Adeline Couzins

Arizona "Ma" Barker · Ash Grove · Greene County · Howell County · Oregon County · Outlaw · Shelley Winters · St. Louis · Thayer · West Plains

Arizona “Ma” Barker

Stop for a moment, and imagine Ma Barker.  Is she waving a Tommy gun, chawing a cigar, and plotting a bank robbery?  Is she brow-beating her weak-willed criminal sons, and generally being a role model for overbearing mothers everywhere?  We thought so. Well, you have two people to thank for that wildly inaccurate image: FBI founder… Continue reading Arizona “Ma” Barker

Bellefontaine Cemetery · Edna Gellhorn · St. Louis · Voting Rights · Walkless Talkless Parade · Washington University

Edna Gellhorn

Edna Gellhorn was an activist: when something needed changed, she worked on it. Lucky for her, she had resources  to help her, an activist mother, and a very supportive husband. She dabbled with food and sanitation issues before WWI, worked to ensure a safe milk supply for babies, and finally found her cause with women's voting rights. Simply put, she said "I… Continue reading Edna Gellhorn

Author · Bellefontaine Cemetery · Irma Rombauer · St. Louis · St. Louis Walk of Fame

Irma Rombauer

 Irma Rombauer has helped millions of people tame the cooking "beast" with her cookbook, The Joy of Cooking. Before Julia Child, Rombauer produced a useable cookbook for the 1930's housewife. It was affordable, well-organized and included step-by-step recipes designed to save time in the kitchen. Irma (von Starkloff) Rombauer was born to a prominent German family in St. Louis in… Continue reading Irma Rombauer

Author · Calvary Cemetery · Kate Chopin · St. Louis · St. Louis Walk of Fame

Kate Chopin

Kate Chopin wrote several works of fiction in the 1890s and was a native of St. Louis. Her fiction is filled with themes about women discovering themselves in new ways, searching for their identity and revolting against gender conformity and social norms that limit women's potential. She published 2 novels and about 100 short stories in… Continue reading Kate Chopin

Author · Medium · Patience Worth · Pearl Curran · St. Louis

Pearl Curran & Patience Worth

In July 1913, St. Louis housewife Pearl Curran began boggling minds the world over.  While dabbling with a Ouija board at her apartment at 6031 Kingsbury Avenue, Pearl inadvertently summoned the spirit of long-dead Patience Worth. Patience, per Pearl, had come from England to America in the 1600s, where she'd had the bad fortune to… Continue reading Pearl Curran & Patience Worth

African American · Broadway · Civil Rights Activist · Dancer · Hall of Famous Missourians · Jefferson City · Josephine Baker · St. Louis · St. Louis Walk of Fame

Josephine Baker

“. . . I improvised, crazed by the music. . . . Even my teeth and eyes burned with fever. Each time I leaped I seemed to touch the sky and when I regained earth it seemed to be mine alone.” Josephine Baker only spent the first 15 years of her life in Missouri but… Continue reading Josephine Baker

Bellefontaine Cemetery · Old Courthouse of St. Louis · St. Louis · Virginia Minor · Voting Rights

Virginia Minor

Every woman who votes has Virginia Minor to thank for it. She launched the Woman Suffrage Association of Missouri in 1867, and five years later became a part of a nation-wide throwdown about women's rights. She first attempted to register to vote and when denied, her husband sued the St. Louis register of voters on… Continue reading Virginia Minor

Broadway · Hosmer Hall · Humansville · Movies · Playwright · Pulitzer Prize · St. Louis · Zoe Akins

From Humansville to Hollywood

Zoe Akins wrote a play in the early 1950s called The Greeks Had a Word For It. In 1953, it was adapted for the screen as, How to Marry a Millionaire. Marilyn Monroe, Betty Grable and Lauran Bacall starred in the film, and it made Marilyn Monroe popular. Zoe Akins's time in Hollywood came at… Continue reading From Humansville to Hollywood

Author · Fannie Hurst · Jewish · Movies · New Mt. Sinai Cemetery · St. Louis · Washington University

Fannie Hurst

Fun fact: one of the 2 highest paid authors (male or female) in 1925 grew up in Missouri: Fannie Hurst. No, not from the publishing family, rather, a child born to Jewish immigrants, who grew up as a sheltered only child and graduated from Washington University in 1909. Fannie had a thirst for social knowledge.… Continue reading Fannie Hurst